Het andere mysterie van Paaseiland

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wo 01 jun 2011, 15:04

Het andere mysterie van Paaseiland...

Ik kwam onderstaande tegen tijdens het surfen en wilde het hier toch even delen... LET OP: Wel Engels-talig!!


The Other Mystery of Easter Island


Easter Island is branded into popular consciousness as the home of the mysterious and towering moai statues, but these are not the only curiosity the South Pacific island holds. Where the moai are fascinating for their unknown purpose and mysterious craftsmen, the island’s lost language of Rongorongo is equally perplexing. The unique written language seems to have appeared suddenly in the 1700s, but within just two centuries it was exiled to obscurity.

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Known as Rapa Nui to the island’s inhabitants, Rongorongo is a writing system comprised of pictographs. It has been found carved into many oblong wooden tablets and other artifacts from the island’s history. The art of writing was not known in any nearby islands and the script’s mere existence is sufficient to confound anthropologists. The most plausible explanation so far has been that the Easter Islanders were inspired by the writing they observed in 1770 when the Spanish claimed the island. However, despite its recency, no linguist or archaeologist has been able to successfully decipher the Rongorongo language.

When early Europeans discovered Easter Island, its somewhat isolated ecosystem was suffering from the effects of limited natural resources, deforestation, and overpopulation. Over the following years the island’s population of four thousand or so was slowly eroded by Western disease and deportation by slave traders. By 1877, only about one hundred and ten inhabitants remained. Rongorongo was one victim of these circumstances. The colonizers of Easter Island had decided that the strange language was too closely tied to the inhabitants’ pagan past, and forbade it as a form of communication. Missionaries forced the inhabitants to destroy the tablets with Rongorongo inscriptions.

In 1864, Father Joseph Eyraud became the first non-islander to record Rongorongo. Writing before the ultimate decline of the Eastern Island society, he noted that “one finds in all the houses wooden tables or staffs covered with sorts of hieroglyphs.” Despite his interest in the subject, he was not able to find an Islander willing to translate the texts. The islanders were understandably reluctant to help, given that the Europeans forcefully suppressed the use of their native writing.

Some time later, Bishop Florentin Jaussen of Tahiti attempted to translate the texts. A young Easter Islander named Metero claimed to be able to read Rongorongo, and for fifteen days the bishop kept a record while the boy dictated from the inscriptions. Bishop Jaussen gave up the effort when he realized that Metero was a fraud; the boy had assigned several meanings to the same symbol.

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In 1886 Paymaster William Thompson of the ship USS Mohican became interested in the pictographic system during a journey to collect artifacts for the National Museum in Washington. He had obtained two rare tablets engraved with the script and was curious about their meaning. He asked eighty-three-year-old islander Ure Va’e Iko for assistance in translation because his age made him more likely to have knowledge of the language. The man reluctantly admitted to knowing what the tablets said, but did not wish to break the orders of the missionaries. As a result, Ure Va’e Iko refused to touch the tablets, let alone decipher them.

Thompson was determined, however, and decided that Ure Va’e Iko might be more forthcoming under the influence of alcohol. After having a few drinks kindly provided by Thompson, the Easter Islander looked at the tablets once again. The old man burst into song, singing a fertility chant which described the mating of gods and goddesses. William Thompson and his companions quickly took down his words. This was potentially a big breakthrough, but Thomson struggled with assigning words to the pictographs. Furthermore, he couldn’t find another Islander who was willing to confirm the accuracy of this translation. While Thompson was ultimately unable to read Rongorongo, the translation that Iko provided has remained one of the most valuable clues on how to decipher the tablets.

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In the following decades, many scholars have attempted to make sense of this mystery. In 1932, Wilhelm de Hevesy tried to link Rongorongo to the Indus script of the Indus Valley Civilization in India, claiming that as many as forty Rongorongo symbols had a correlating symbol in the script from India. Further examination found this link to be much more superficial than originally believed. In the 1950s, Thomas Barthel became one of the first linguists of the modern era to make a study of Rongorongo. He stated that system contained 120 basic elements that, when combined, formed 1500 different signs. Furthermore, he asserted that the symbols represented both objects and ideas. This made it more difficult to produce a translation because an individual symbol could potentially represent an entire phrase. Barthel was successful, however, in identifying an artifact known as the Mamri tablet as a lunar calendar.

Afbeelding


Some of the most recent research has been conducted by a linguist named Steven Fischer. Having studied nearly every surviving example of Rongorongo, he took particular interest in a four-foot-long scepter that had once been the property of an Easter Island Chief. The artifact is covered in pictographs, and Fischer noticed that every third symbol on this staff has an additional “phallus-like” symbol attached to it.

This led Fischer to believe that all Rongorongo texts have a structure steeped in counts of three, or triads. He has also studied Ure Va’e Iko’s fertility chant, which lent additional support to the concept. Iko had always named a god first, his goddess mate second, and their offspring third. Fischer has also tried to make the claim that all Rongorongo texts relate creation myths. Looking at another text, he has suggested that a sentence with a symbol of a bird, a fish, and a sun reads “All the birds copulated with fish: there issued forth the sun.” While this could be the translation, it bears little resemblance to Ure Va’e Iko’s chant about the matings of gods and goddesses.

Rongorongo naturally commands a great deal of interest from linguists, anthropologists, and archaeologists. Only twenty-five texts are know to have survived. Should anyone find a workable translation for Rongorongo, the knowledge stored on the remaining tablets might explain the mysterious statues of Easter Island, the sudden appearance of the written language, and the island’s history and customs as whole. However, much like the statues which have so captivated popular imagination, Rongorongo has so far defied all attempts at explanation.
Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rongorongo

Meer: http://www.rongorongo.org/

Bron: http://www.damninteresting.com/the-othe ... er-island/

Ook op ATS een draadje: http://www.abovetopsecret.com/forum/thread711180/pg1
1119 AD
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Lid geworden op: za 21 aug 2010, 21:27

wo 01 jun 2011, 18:22

En een oudje op qff :

Paaseiland - Moai and Ahu
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Lid geworden op: di 10 mei 2011, 15:32

wo 01 jun 2011, 21:39

Beetje kort door de bocht maar het zal wel gaan over neuken en eten. Maan standen, getijden en zo. De rest van tijd gingen ze portretten maken van hun gezichten die misschien dan een bepaalde positie hebben ten opzichte van?? de maan of zo.
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Lid geworden op: di 01 nov 2011, 18:18

ma 14 mei 2012, 17:08

Wauw, de hoofden van Paaseiland hebben lichamen met symbolen erop!!! :woohoo:

De website hieronder beheert het project, tjek it out!



"Both of our excavated statues, as you know from our previous letters, are intriguing because they are nearly unique on Easter Island. While many statues have individual petroglyphs, these and only one other statue—of over 1,000 we have documented—have multiple petroglyphs carved as a composition on their backs. Underlying these carvings is a complex symbol found on less than 100 statues. It is referred to by previous researchers as the “ring and girdle” design, and sometimes said to represent the “sun and rainbow.” However, statue RR-001-156 and some others have two “rings” above the crescent “girdle.” We have long interpreted this form as the Rapa Nui version of the Polynesian maro or loincloth (maro is also a unit of measurement). As we noted long ago on a statue torso (007) at Ahu Oroi (12-460), the upright “Y” or “M” element below the maro on both of our excavated statues represents two hafted adzes. This depiction, which may be interpreted as evidence of craft specialization in the form of an emblem, is not consistent, however, and in some cases outside of the quarry it appears to depict other objects. Cristián Arévalo Pakarati, co-director of EISP, has spent hundreds of hours on site over the past months painstakingly measuring and drawing these designs as he supervises the site during our seasonal hiatus from on-going excavations."
website http://www.eisp.org/
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Lid geworden op: wo 21 aug 2013, 18:13

ma 14 mei 2012, 22:27

Wie gelooft er hier trouwens echt dat die dingen op z'n vroegst pas in 1250 gebouwd zijn? (die moai)
Moraliteit ∝ Vrijheid
Real eyes realize real lies!!
Natural Law: The REAL law of attraction | The end of all evil
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ma 14 mei 2012, 22:28

Ik denk dat ze overduidelijk een stuk ouder zijn.
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Lid geworden op: zo 29 apr 2012, 18:18

ma 14 mei 2012, 22:52

Menig kunstenaar liet zich eind 19e/begin 20e eeuw inspireren door de cult(uur) en cult(us) van de Polynesische.
Max Ernst liet zich inspireren door de zogenaamde Tangata Manu die de 'vogelman-cult(us)' vormde.
Er zijn veel verhalen over de oorsprong en het verloop in de cult van de vogelman die zeker het lezen e/o onderzoeken waard zijn. Ondanks 'gedegen' onderzoek van de antropologie zeg ik:

1 ei is geen ei.

Een (naar mijn mening) mooi voor-beeld van Ernsts fascinatie is dit werk: "After Us Motherhood"

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Lid geworden op: zo 29 apr 2012, 18:18

ma 14 mei 2012, 23:14

[quote=""Dromen" post=55118"]Ik denk dat ze overduidelijk een stuk ouder zijn.[/quote]

Ik denk dat ze overduidelijk een stuk ouder zijn

Niet om te dissen Dromen, maar er zit een beetje ruis op de lijn: Je denkt overduidelijk-zijn?

Als je alle pluis uit deze navel van de wereld heb gehaald dat je dan nog weleens een Nobelprijs o.i.d. in de wacht kan slepen. Er zijn al zoveel antropologen en kunstenaars en weet ik wie (met Thor Heyerdahl voorop) afgetogen naar Rapa Nui en niemand die ook maar iets met zekerheid weet te melden over de werkelijke reden van de beelden (en de plateaus, hoofddeksels).

Er zijn zoveel scenario's over de Moai en hun verwekkers.
De oorlog(en) tussen de lang-oren en de kort-oren, het verloren continent MU, verloren beschaving 1, verloren beschaving 2, het grid met al haar knooppunten, uitzicht op voorouders, cosmo, astro, rongo rongo en misschien wel libido.

Maar verdorie... wat zijn het toch een krachtige beelden! B)
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wo 16 mei 2012, 23:40

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Lid geworden op: di 16 aug 2011, 21:10

do 24 mei 2012, 01:51

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vr 22 jun 2012, 20:54

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vr 22 jun 2012, 23:13

Grappig filmpje en cool om te zien die methode, maar zal werken zonder vlakke ondergrond :silly:
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zo 02 sep 2012, 20:47

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