Spaulding, DeVoss & the Chronovisor

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John Chambers wrote and extensive article on the Chronovisor for the 26th issue of Atlantis Rising. It appears at pages 34, 36, 65, 66 and 68. We commend the entire article to your critical review. Was Baird T. Spalding a charlatan or worse -- a fraud? If he was we have several disturbing questions to answer. How did he come by his very thorough spiritual insights? Why and who funded his 40 years of archeological and geophysical research and translations in the Gobi Desert and the Himalayas? Was Baird at mining engineer? In whose emply was he? Why do some say he did a multi-millionaire and others say he was penniless? What happened to his voluminous research? Where are those translations of ancient texts that ancestors though significant enough to record on gold tablets?

Here are some excerpts from the Atlantis Rising article by John Chambers. Your thoughts?

“Europe by those as eminent as French President François Mitterand. Why should a man of such accomplishment and recognition feel compelled to confabulate a story about a time machine? Why did Father Ernetti, in the last ten years of his life, become increasingly silent about the chronovisor? Was the Vatican gradually suppressing this brilliant man? Were yet more powerful forces suppressing his astonishing invention? Until recently, traveling through
time—in particular, backward in time— had been considered impossible. Today, eminent scientists are beginning to debate the conditions under which it could occur.

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Picture of San Grigorio Island

University of Oxford physicist, David Deutsch, says relativity theory suggests that space-time can become so distorted that bits of it can break off to form closed space-time loops. Such ‘world-lines’ would be ‘timelike’ all the way around,” says Deutsch; if we followed part of such a
closed timeline curve (or CTC) “we could return to the past and participate in events there.” Writing in Scientific American for March, 1994, Deutsch and Oxford philosopher Michael Lockwood cite physicist Stephen Hawking as stating that “quantum-mechanical effects would either prevent CTCs from forming or would destroy any would-be time traveler approaching one,” making time travel to the past impossible.” Page 36

“I can think of half-a-dozen ways in which we could not be awash in time travelers, and still time travel is possible,” said now-deceased Carl Sagan on a NOVA TV documentary on time travel in 1994. Sagan said it might be possible to build a time machine that can go into the future, but not into the past—but we don’t know about this because we haven’t yet invented that time machine. ... Sagan put forth the possibility that the time travelers are here but we can’t see them, perhaps because they’ve perfected something like an invisibility cloak. “If they have such highly developed technology, then, why not?” he said. The author/astronomer speculated that the time travelers are here, and we see them, but “we call them something else—UFOs or ghosts or hobgoblins or fairies or something like that.” Sagan said that, finally, “there’s the possibility that time travel is perfectly possible, but it requires a great advance in our technology, and human civilization will destroy itself before time travelers invent it. I’m sure there are other possibilities as well,” Sagan concluded, “but if you just think of that range of possibilities, I don’t think the fact that we’re not obviously being visited by time travelers shows that time travel is
impossible. ... Many other scientists agree with Carl Sagan. In a recent book, Beyond Eternity (Jenseites der Ewigkeit, Langen-Müller, 2000), noted German time travel authority/author Ernst Meckelburg cites the theoretical proof for the possibility of time travel put forward as far back as 1988 by MIT astrophysicists Michael Morris, Kip Thorne and Ulvi Yurtsever in a paper published in Physical Review Letters. In earlier works, such as Zeittunnel (Time Tunnel, Langen-Müller, 1997) and Zeitschock (Time Shock, Langen-Müller, 1995), the Hanau-based author has cited the far-reaching speculations of eminent scientists, such as Israeli physicist Yakir Aharanov and Princeton cosmologist Richard Gott, which have helped place the study of time travel on a respectable footing.

Meckelburg, who received the Swiss Dr. A. Hedri Award for epipsychology (study of post-death mental states) in 1997, the same year Drs. John Mack and David Jacobs received it for exopsychology (study of the ET mind), believes, along with the scientists he cites at length, that time travel must be a fairly commonplace occurrence in the universe.” Page 65

Sidebar on David Deutsch - Oxford Quantum Physicist

DAVID DEUTSCH: Quantum mechanics is a theory of many parallel universes. Some of them are alike and some of them are very unlike. There are nearby universes that differ from this one only in the position of one photon or one electron. There are other more distant universes where we're not filming here at all and there are others where I was never even born. ... I myself believe that there will one day be time travel because when we find that something isn't forbidden by the over-arching laws of physics we usually eventually find a technological way of doing it. (“Time Travel, PBS Broadcast NOV – 1999).

It’s in regard to the cases where actual physical time machines may be involved that there may be another reason why time travel from the future, or elsewhere, may be happening, and we don’t know about it. According to journalist Miguel Jones, translator of Peter Krassa’s Father Ernetti’s Chronovisor: The Creation and Disappearance of the World’s First Time Machine (New Paradigm Books, 2000), its presence might be suppressed by one or another government in the same way as, according to Philip Corso in The Day After Roswell, the U.S. government suppressed news of the retrieval and backengineering of UFOs downed in New Mexico in 1947, even while clandestinely introducing alien technology (such as lasers) into our society. The Flagstaff, AZ-based Jones said that Father Ernetti repeatedly reaffirmed that “anyone building a time machine would have to keep it a complete secret. If word got out, the government, or evil people, would steal or appropriate the machine.” The ability to time travel confers enormous power, remarks Jones. “You could murder someone and change thepresent in a way that suited you. You could travel into the future and bring back knowledge which would enable you to assume absolute control in the present.” The journalist/translator noted this was the principal reason Ernetti gave for not divulging details of the chronovisor: “He was afraid villains would steal it and use it to control the world.” Jones quoted Father Ernetti as saying that for a year-and-a-half he couldn’t leave the monastery of San Giorgio Maggiore unless he was accompanied by two bodyguards because “the American and Russian intelligence agencies had taken an interest in him and had sent spies to shadow his every move.” Helena R. Olmo, a Spanish journalist who spent three months in Italy in 2000 researching Father Ernetti for a forthcoming book, says that, according to her sources, both the Vatican Secret Service and the Italian Secret Service detained someone in 1965 who they thought had sold information to the Russians on work being done on the chronovisor in Venice by Father Ernetti.

“The incident was mentioned in the Russian press,” says Olmo, who lives in Madrid. Has the U.S. government—perhaps in some future form—suppressed time travelers? “I don’t know,” ponders Ernst Meckelburg, “but if you look at the bizarre 2000 American presidential elections, to cite just one example, you can see that anything is possible.” Meckelburg has long wondered if the collapse of the Soviet Union and the reunification of Germany “might have been arranged from our very future.”

George Andrews, well-known author of such works as Extra-Terrestrial Friends and Foes (Illuminet Press, 1993), notes that Father Ernetti was at the peak of his activities at about the same time the CIA’s MK-ULTRA project meant to explore the possibility of time travel and much else, was itself in full swing. Andrews remarks that the research of the well-known, respected— and talkative—Benedictine priest could not have escaped the notice of the CIA—or the KGB or any other major intelligence agency. ... (page 66)

Jones says a cover-up may well have been a part of the Baird T. Spalding story (also told in detail in Father Ernetti’s Chronovisor). “For sure, a great deal of what Spalding said about himself during his lifetime was absolutely untrue. So was a whole lot of what Doug DeVorss said about Spalding. But DeVorss was in touch with Spalding on a daily basis for years, and often traveled with him. He must have known the truth. “But despite all these untruths, Baird T. Spalding was incredibly knowledgeable in many areas of esoteric learning. How did he acquire that knowledge? Doug DeVorss was murdered at just about the time people were beginning to ask questions. Now we’ll never know.” (Page 68)


Bron:
http://evolutionopensource.blogspot.nl/ ... latan.html
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What is the Chronovisor?



According to French priest and paranormal author, François Brune, the Chronovisor was a device owned by the Vatican which allowed people to view events in the past or future. Brune’s 2002 book, “The Vatican’s New Mystery” alleges that the Chronovisor was built in the 1950s by Italian scientist and priest, Father Pellegrino Maria Ernetti (1925-1994), along with twelve world-renowned scientists. Among the scientists named by Father Ernetti, were Nobel Laureate and physicist Enrico Fermi, and rocket scientist Wernher von Braun.

The Chronovisor has been described as a large cabinet with antennae made from alloys of unknown metals, a connected cathode ray tube, and a control panel of buttons and levers. According to “The Vatican’s New Mystery”, Father Ernetti claimed that the Chronovisor could be programmed to view and record specific times, locations, and even people in the past or future. Father Ernetti further claimed that the Chronovisor functioned by processing electromagnetic radiation residue from past events.

Father Ernetti purported to have personally seen a number of important historical events with the Chronovisor, the most notable being the crucifixion of Christ. In 1972, the May issue of Italian weekly news magazine, “La Domenica del Corriere” (Courier's Sunday), published a photo depicting the crucifixion and claimed that it had been taken with the Chronovisor. Father Ernetti denied this, citing the photo’s clarity and proximity as uncharacteristic of the Chronovisor’s photographic capabilities. The photo later revealed to be strikingly similar to a reverse-image of a wood carving by sculptor, Cullot Valera.

In addition to the crucifixion and a speech given by Napoleon Bonaparte, Father Ernetti also claimed to have seen a 169 BC production of the tragedy, “Thyestes”, which has been considered a lost work in modern times as only a few fragments of the text remain intact. Father Ernetti claimed to have reconstructed the entire text, which was later translated to English by Princeton University professor, Dr. Katherine Owen Eldred. Eldred noted in her analysis that she believed Ernetti had written the play himself rather than transcribing an original performance.

In a 2003 interview, François Brune relayed that a few months prior to Father Ernetti’s death in 1994, Ernetti told him that he had just partaken in a meeting at the Vatican with the last remaining scientists who worked on the Chronovisor. According to Father Ernetti via Brune, the Chronovisor had been dismantled by that time. On his death bed, Father Ernetti reportedly recanted his claims of the Chronovisor; however, Brune theorized that Ernetti was coerced into making a false confession.

Bron:
http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-the-chronovisor.htm#
Laatst gewijzigd door FreeElectron op do 20 mar 2014, 18:29, 1 keer totaal gewijzigd.
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The Vatican’s time machine..the Chronovisor


Chronovisor was the name given to a machine that was said to be capable of viewing past and future events. Its existence was alleged by François Brune, author of several books on paranormal phenomena and religion. In his book The Vatican’s New Mystery he claimed that the device had been built by the Italian priest and scientist Father Pellegrino Maria Ernetti (1925-1994). While Father Ernetti was a real person, the existence (much less the functionality) of the chronovisor has never been confirmed.

In the early 1960s Ernetti stated to François Brune, himself a Roman Catholic priest and author, that Ernetti helped to construct the machine as part of a team which included twelve world-famous scientists, of whom he named two, Enrico Fermi and Wernher von Braun. The chronovisor was portrayed as a large cabinet with a normal cathode ray tube for viewing the received events and a series of buttons, levers, and other controls for selecting the time and the location to be viewed. It could also focus and track specific people. According to its inventor, it worked by receiving, decoding and reproducing the electromagnetic radiation left behind from past events, though it could also pick up sound waves.

Ernetti lacked hard evidence for these claims. He said that he observed, among other historical events, Christ’s crucifixion and photographed it. A photo of this, Ernetti said, appeared in the May 2, 1972 issue of La Domenica del Corriere, an Italian weekly news magazine. However, a near-identical (though mirrored left to right) photograph of a wood carving by the sculptor Cullot Valera, turned up, casting doubt upon Ernetti’s statement.

Through the chronovisor, Ernetti said that he had witnessed, among other scenes, a performance in Rome in 169 BC of the lost tragedy, Thyestes, by the father of Latin poetry, Quintus Ennius. Dr. Katherine Owen Eldred of Princeton University, the translator of an English rendition of the text, included as an appendix to the American printing of Peter Krassa’s book on the Chronovisor (see below), believes that Ernetti wrote the play himself. According to the alleged “confession” (purportedly kept anonymous on the request of the person, said to be a relative of Ernetti’s) included in the American edition, on his deathbed had Ernetti confessed that he had written the text of the play himself, and that the “photo” of Christ was indeed a “lie”. According to the same “source”, however, Ernetti also affirmed that the machine was workable.

Brune does not believe Ernetti’s “confession” and is convinced that the authorities had coerced Ernetti into making a false confession.

The alleged existence of the chronovisor has fueled a whole series of conspiracy theories, such as that the device was seized and is actually used by the Vatican or by those that secretly control the world.

http://www.unmuseum.org/chronovisor.htm

The Missing Time Machine

An eccentric priest claimed he had a machine that could see into the past. Was his story folly or fancy?

In his little 12 by 12 foot monastic cell Father Pellegrino Ernetti greeted Father Francois Brune one afternoon in the early 1960′s. The two men had just met for the first time the day before during a ferry ride across Venice’s Grand Canal. During their short conversation, Father Ernetti had said something that stuck in Father Brune’s mind. The two, who were both experts on ancient languages, were talking about scriptural interpretation when Father Ernetti remarked that there existed a machine that could easily answer all their questions.

Father Brune was puzzled about what kind of machine could do such a thing and resolved to bring it up again with Father Ernetti in that day’s meeting. When asked about it, Father Ernetti described a device he called a “chronovisor” that looked a bit like a television. Instead of receiving broadcasts from local transmission stations, however, the chronovisor could tune into the past to allow the viewer to see and hear events that had occurred years or even centuries earlier. Father Ernetti told Brune that the machine worked by detecting all the sights and sounds that humanity had made that still floated through space. Father Brune wanted to know if Father Ernetti and his collaborators had been able to see the crucifixion of Christ. Ernetti replied, “We saw everything. The agony in the garden, the betrayal of Judas, the trial – Calvary.”

Everyday Chronovisors

What Father Ernetti was describing to Brune, the chronovisor, was a type of time machine. It is unlike the fictional devices found in most popular books, TV shows and movies, however, that transport people into the future or past. This type of time machine would bring pictures and sounds from the past into the present. Time machines that transport people seem far beyond anything our technology can currently build, but what about a device that just deals with images and sounds? Could a machine like Father Ernetti described be built?

We actually use crude versions of chronovisors every day. A security camera hooked to a video recorder will enable us to see into the past. Even something as a simple as mirror is really a type of chronovisor. We don’t see ourselves in the mirror as we currently are, but as we were just a few millionths of a second before: the time it takes the light to travel from our face to the mirror, reflect off and return to our eyes.

Large telescopes also act as chronovisors. The distant galaxies we view through these devices do not actually look like they are today, but as they appeared when the light left them millions, or perhaps billions of years ago. If an alien scientist on a planet one-hundred light years away had a powerful enough telescope that he could view activities on Earth he wouldn’t see recent events, but life as it was a century ago. He would see the Wright Brothers invention of the airplane, not the launch of a space shuttle.

If it is possible to see into the past of a distant galaxy using a telescope, why can’t a device be built that would allow us to peer into history here back on Earth?

Undoubtedly such as device would be much more complicated than even the most advanced telescope. Telescopes can see back in time, but what part of history they view is entirely a function of how far away the object is. A star 500 light-years away can only be seen as it was five centuries ago, not as it was a hundred years later or earlier than that. And, of course, they can only view what is visible from earth. We cannot see what is on the far side of the Crab Nebula no matter how much we are interested in what it looks like. The device described by Father Ernetti, however, seemed to be able to tune into almost any era and any location.

The Secret Team of Scientists

How did the priest get a hold of such a fantastic machine? According to what he told Brune, he had been working with a Father Agostino Gemelli at the Catholic University of Milan trying to filter harmonics out of Georgoian chants when they heard the voice of Gemelli’s late father speaking to them on the wire recorder they were using (Gemelli later confirmed this incident). This got the priest thinking about what happened to all the sights and sounds humans make. Did they disappear completely or do they continue to exist in some way? Ernetti approached some eminent scientists and assembled a team to work on the project. The group inclided Enrico Fermi (one of the designers of the first atomic bomb) and Wernher von Braun (the German rocket scientist).

The team built the chronovisor so it could tune into any time or place. They observed not only the crucifixion of Christ, but French conqueror Napoleon, the Roman philosopher Cicero, and the play Thyestes by the Roman poet Quintus Ennius.

Brune was astonished that he had not heard of the invention of this device. “Why hide such a discovery?” he asked.

Father Ernetti replied that the team had decided to voluntarily dismantle the device. Since it could tune into any place at any time in the past it left no room for privacy. In the wrong hands, Ernetti said, it could create the “most fearsome dictatorship the world has ever seen.”

Father Ernetti also spoke at some conferences on paranormal phenomena discussing his machine. While he never produced the device itself, he was eventually coaxed into displaying some forms of proof. The first was the text of the play Thyestes.

Father Ernetti’s Proof

The play Thyestes was written by Quintus Ennius who was born 239 B.C. in what is now Calabria, Italy. Ennius is sometimes called the “Father of Latin Poetry” and over the course of his lifetime he wrote about 20 plays and an epic poem on the history of Rome called Annals. Only a few fragments of his work survive. His last play Thyestes was produced only shortly before his death in 169 B.C.. Scholars have wondered about this play for centuries. Though they know what the story was about based on the writings of the first century author Seneca, the actual text, except for a few lines, has been lost to history.

Sometime in the late 60′s a Professor Giuseppe Marasca became interested in the stories he was reading about Father Ernetti and his machine. Marasca contacted Ernetti and eventually they became friends. Ernetti promised to show Marasca his machine, but never did. What he did present to the professor was a handwritten manuscript of what he indicated was the complete play, Thyestes, that he had supposedly copied down while watching the chronovisor. Marasca held onto the text for a number of years, refusing to show it to anybody. Eventually he passed copies to select individuals including Father Brune.

A second piece of evidence that Father Ernetti released was a picture of Christ’s face while he was on the cross, apparently photographed through the chronovisor. The photo shows the face of a bearded man with upturned eyes. It wasn’t long, however, before someone noticed that the picture was identical (except being reversed left-to-right) to one sold at the Sanctuary of Merciful Love in Collevalenza, Italy. The photograph shows a wooden carving of Jesus in the sanctuary by the Spanish artist Cullot Valera.

After this revelation Father Ernetti said little more about the photograph and the chronovisor. He died in 1994.

As for the manuscript of Thyestes that he said he had transcribed from watching the play on the chronovisor, it seems too short – only 120 lines – for it to be the full play. Most plays of this type would have been ten times as long. Dr. Katherine Owen Eldred of Princeton University, an expert on the play who translated the manuscript for the American edition of the book Father Ernetti’s Chronovisor, suspects that isn’t authentic. Many of the words used in this manuscript didn’t appear in the Latin language until over two centuries after the play was first performed. The type of words and the way they are repeated also suggest that the person who composed the manuscript had limited skills in Latin. As Ennius, the playwright, was using his native language this seems very strange. This makes one wonder if the author wasn’t Ennius, but Father Ernetti himself.

The Enigma of Father Ernetti

What can we make of this strange story? It would be easy to dismiss Father Ernetti as a crackpot or compulsive liar. Outside of his entanglement with the chronovisor, however, Father Ernetti was an extremely respected, but quiet, intellectual whose specialty was archaic music. He spent most of his life doing research and teaching on this subject and was the author of such respected books as Words, Music, Rhythm and the multi-volume work General Treatise on Gregrian Chant. Why would such a respected clergyman, academic and author make up such a wild story?

After the Father’s death the editors of Father Ernetti’s Chronovisor received a document from someone claiming to be a relative of Ernetti but wishing to remain anonymous. The document tells of how this relative was called to Ernetti’s deathbed and the priest confessed that he had made up the play and falsified the picture. However, Ernetti continued to insist that the chronovisor actually worked.

Since the document is anonymous it is hard to know how much faith to place in it. Father Brune, Ernetti’s long time friend, believes that the chronovisor existed, but Ernetti came under pressure from his superiors in the last years of his life not to talk about it. Brune thinks the resemblance of the picture to the statue can be explained by the artist carving the work under the direction of a nun who had a vision. In the vision she saw Christ hanging on the cross and described it to the artist. The artist translated her vision exactly into the sculpture. The sculpture and the photo look alike because they both are true representations of Christ’s face. One coming to us via the chronovisor, the other through the nun’s vision, suggested Brune.

We may never be able to prove that the story of Ernetti’s chronovisor was false, but with our technical capabilities expanding continually might it be possible to someday build such a device?

Paleoacoustics

Trying to gather the remnants of electromagnetic waves left over in the environment and reassemble them into a coherent image seems an overwhelming task, even with the most advanced computers. Some scientists have speculated, however, that we may find past sounds preserved in the environment. They’ve even given this speculative branch of science a name: Paleoacoustics.

The idea is that sound waves might have been recorded and preserved by accident. One possible way this could happen would be during the creation of pottery. In theory, a clay vessel spun on a potter’s wheel and given a spiral pattern with a stylus would act like a primitive phonograph. On early phonographs, sounds were preserved by using a tin (or later wax) cylinder spun with a needle, etching a spiral groove down the surface of the cylinder. The needle would pick up sounds waves and etch the vibrations into the grooves. When the needle traveled down the groove a second time, the effect would reverse itself and the needle would vibrate, playing back the recorded sound.

On the pottery wheel the soft clay of the pot would act as the recording medium and the stylus as the needle. In theory the sound vibrations could be etched into the clay. Given that this method of creating pottery has been around for thousands of years this technique seems to hold out the promise of bringing back sounds from the ancient past.

Though this idea for recovering ancient sounds has been around since it was proposed by Richard G. Woodbridge in a letter to Proceedings of the IEEE in 1969, nobody has yet been successful in recovering ancient sounds (a hoax in 2006 suggesting Belgian researchers had accomplished this with a 2,000 year old piece of pottery fooled a number of people as it made the rounds through various newspapers and across the internet). However, as our instruments become more sensitive and our computers more powerful we may yet see success with this type of investigation.

Still, if these techniques are successful they would still be a far cry from Ernetti’s chronovisor which could tune into the past at any place or time. Will we ever be able to build a machine like he described? Only time will tell.

Bron:
http://seeker401.wordpress.com/2009/09/ ... ronovisor/
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Pieter Kuhn, de tekenaar, en Evert Werkman, de schrijver van de serie "Kapitein Rob", moeten op 1 of andere manier hiervan hebben geweten.

In het 8e verhaal, "De terugkeer van Peer den Schuijmer", ontmoet Rob de Franse professor Prudon die een dergelijk toestel heeft ontwikkeld, het "Historisch oog'.
Dit is een uniek apparaat dat de gebruiker in staat stelt terug te reizen in de geschiedenis. Het lukt Rob op die manier om zelf deel te nemen aan de avonturen van Peer den Schuymer in de 17e eeuw.

Ook in enkele andere verhalen van Kapitein Rob wordt er gebruik gemaakt van dit apparaat.
Waren Kuhn en Werkman inderdaad bekend met de Chronovisor of is dit weer 1 van die opvallende "syncs"?

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Kapitein Rob en professor Prudon
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Lid geworden op: za 21 aug 2010, 16:08

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http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_n4r4CbQgG_o/R ... alding.jpg


John Chambers wrote and extensive article on the Chronovisor for the 26th issue of Atlantis Rising. It appears at pages 34, 36, 65, 66 and 68. We commend the entire article to your critical review. Was Baird T. Spalding a charlatan or worse -- a fraud? If he was we have several disturbing questions to answer. How did he come by his very thorough spiritual insights? Why and who funded his 40 years of archeological and geophysical research and translations in the Gobi Desert and the Himalayas? Was Baird at mining engineer? In whose emply was he? Why do some say he did a multi-millionaire and others say he was penniless? What happened to his voluminous research? Where are those translations of ancient texts that ancestors though significant enough to record on gold tablets?

Here are some excerpts from the Atlantis Rising article by John Chambers. Your thoughts?

“Europe by those as eminent as French President François Mitterand. Why should a man of such accomplishment and recognition feel compelled to confabulate a story about a time machine? Why did Father Ernetti, in the last ten years of his life, become increasingly silent about the chronovisor? Was the Vatican gradually suppressing this brilliant man? Were yet more powerful forces suppressing his astonishing invention? Until recently, traveling through
time—in particular, backward in time— had been considered impossible. Today, eminent scientists are beginning to debate the conditions under which it could occur.

Afbeelding
http://bp2.blogger.com/_n4r4CbQgG_o/RgL ... bhujj9E6Ck
/s400/benedictine_abbey_san_grigorio.jpg
Picture of San Grigorio Island

University of Oxford physicist, David Deutsch, says relativity theory suggests that space-time can become so distorted that bits of it can break off to form closed space-time loops. Such ‘world-lines’ would be ‘timelike’ all the way around,” says Deutsch; if we followed part of such a
closed timeline curve (or CTC) “we could return to the past and participate in events there.” Writing in Scientific American for March, 1994, Deutsch and Oxford philosopher Michael Lockwood cite physicist Stephen Hawking as stating that “quantum-mechanical effects would either prevent CTCs from forming or would destroy any would-be time traveler approaching one,” making time travel to the past impossible.” Page 36

“I can think of half-a-dozen ways in which we could not be awash in time travelers, and still time travel is possible,” said now-deceased Carl Sagan on a NOVA TV documentary on time travel in 1994. Sagan said it might be possible to build a time machine that can go into the future, but not into the past—but we don’t know about this because we haven’t yet invented that time machine. ... Sagan put forth the possibility that the time travelers are here but we can’t see them, perhaps because they’ve perfected something like an invisibility cloak. “If they have such highly developed technology, then, why not?” he said. The author/astronomer speculated that the time travelers are here, and we see them, but “we call them something else—UFOs or ghosts or hobgoblins or fairies or something like that.” Sagan said that, finally, “there’s the possibility that time travel is perfectly possible, but it requires a great advance in our technology, and human civilization will destroy itself before time travelers invent it. I’m sure there are other possibilities as well,” Sagan concluded, “but if you just think of that range of possibilities, I don’t think the fact that we’re not obviously being visited by time travelers shows that time travel is
impossible. ... Many other scientists agree with Carl Sagan. In a recent book, Beyond Eternity (Jenseites der Ewigkeit, Langen-Müller, 2000), noted German time travel authority/author Ernst Meckelburg cites the theoretical proof for the possibility of time travel put forward as far back as 1988 by MIT astrophysicists Michael Morris, Kip Thorne and Ulvi Yurtsever in a paper published in Physical Review Letters. In earlier works, such as Zeittunnel (Time Tunnel, Langen-Müller, 1997) and Zeitschock (Time Shock, Langen-Müller, 1995), the Hanau-based author has cited the far-reaching speculations of eminent scientists, such as Israeli physicist Yakir Aharanov and Princeton cosmologist Richard Gott, which have helped place the study of time travel on a respectable footing.

Meckelburg, who received the Swiss Dr. A. Hedri Award for epipsychology (study of post-death mental states) in 1997, the same year Drs. John Mack and David Jacobs received it for exopsychology (study of the ET mind), believes, along with the scientists he cites at length, that time travel must be a fairly commonplace occurrence in the universe.” Page 65

Sidebar on David Deutsch - Oxford Quantum Physicist

DAVID DEUTSCH: Quantum mechanics is a theory of many parallel universes. Some of them are alike and some of them are very unlike. There are nearby universes that differ from this one only in the position of one photon or one electron. There are other more distant universes where we're not filming here at all and there are others where I was never even born. ... I myself believe that there will one day be time travel because when we find that something isn't forbidden by the over-arching laws of physics we usually eventually find a technological way of doing it. (“Time Travel, PBS Broadcast NOV – 1999).

It’s in regard to the cases where actual physical time machines may be involved that there may be another reason why time travel from the future, or elsewhere, may be happening, and we don’t know about it. According to journalist Miguel Jones, translator of Peter Krassa’s Father Ernetti’s Chronovisor: The Creation and Disappearance of the World’s First Time Machine (New Paradigm Books, 2000), its presence might be suppressed by one or another government in the same way as, according to Philip Corso in The Day After Roswell, the U.S. government suppressed news of the retrieval and backengineering of UFOs downed in New Mexico in 1947, even while clandestinely introducing alien technology (such as lasers) into our society. The Flagstaff, AZ-based Jones said that Father Ernetti repeatedly reaffirmed that “anyone building a time machine would have to keep it a complete secret. If word got out, the government, or evil people, would steal or appropriate the machine.” The ability to time travel confers enormous power, remarks Jones. “You could murder someone and change thepresent in a way that suited you. You could travel into the future and bring back knowledge which would enable you to assume absolute control in the present.” The journalist/translator noted this was the principal reason Ernetti gave for not divulging details of the chronovisor: “He was afraid villains would steal it and use it to control the world.” Jones quoted Father Ernetti as saying that for a year-and-a-half he couldn’t leave the monastery of San Giorgio Maggiore unless he was accompanied by two bodyguards because “the American and Russian intelligence agencies had taken an interest in him and had sent spies to shadow his every move.” Helena R. Olmo, a Spanish journalist who spent three months in Italy in 2000 researching Father Ernetti for a forthcoming book, says that, according to her sources, both the Vatican Secret Service and the Italian Secret Service detained someone in 1965 who they thought had sold information to the Russians on work being done on the chronovisor in Venice by Father Ernetti.

“The incident was mentioned in the Russian press,” says Olmo, who lives in Madrid. Has the U.S. government—perhaps in some future form—suppressed time travelers? “I don’t know,” ponders Ernst Meckelburg, “but if you look at the bizarre 2000 American presidential elections, to cite just one example, you can see that anything is possible.” Meckelburg has long wondered if the collapse of the Soviet Union and the reunification of Germany “might have been arranged from our very future.”

George Andrews, well-known author of such works as Extra-Terrestrial Friends and Foes (Illuminet Press, 1993), notes that Father Ernetti was at the peak of his activities at about the same time the CIA’s MK-ULTRA project meant to explore the possibility of time travel and much else, was itself in full swing. Andrews remarks that the research of the well-known, respected— and talkative—Benedictine priest could not have escaped the notice of the CIA—or the KGB or any other major intelligence agency. ... (page 66)

Jones says a cover-up may well have been a part of the Baird T. Spalding story (also told in detail in Father Ernetti’s Chronovisor). “For sure, a great deal of what Spalding said about himself during his lifetime was absolutely untrue. So was a whole lot of what Doug DeVorss said about Spalding. But DeVorss was in touch with Spalding on a daily basis for years, and often traveled with him. He must have known the truth. “But despite all these untruths, Baird T. Spalding was incredibly knowledgeable in many areas of esoteric learning. How did he acquire that knowledge? Doug DeVorss was murdered at just about the time people were beginning to ask questions. Now we’ll never know.” (Page 68)


Bron:
http://evolutionopensource.blogspot.nl/ ... latan.html
Was eerder vanavond al een eind op weg in dit topic todat mijn pa belde. Dus ik ga nu weer verder lezen, heerlijk leesvoer dit FE!!

Dankjewel! Ik denk trouwens dat die ouwe van mij dit ook wel kan waarderen!

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Vatican Sitting On Time Machine?

BOCA RATON, Fla. (Wireless Flash) -- First, the Vatican was accused of hiding the records of priests who've abused kids. Now, it's being accused of hiding a time machine.

The machine in question is called a "Chronovisor" and was built in the 1950s by a Benedictine monk named Father Pellegrino Ernetti.

No photos of the Chronovisor exist, but paranormal journalist John Chambers says Ernetti reportedly used the "way back machine" to film Christ's crucifixion for Vatican officials.

Ernetti died in 1994 without revealing the secret of the Chronovisor but Chambers says evidence is mounting that the Catholic Church is hiding a working model from the rest of the world, supposedly to keep it from getting into evil hands.

Sound crazy? Maybe, but there may be something to it. Chambers says a Jesuit priest named Father Francois Brune believes the Chronovisor must exist because -- in the priest's words -- "Ernetti wouldn't lie about such things."



FATHER ERNETTI'S CHRONOVISOR
The Creation and Disappearance of the World's First Time Machine

by Peter Krassa

ISBN 1-892138-02-6 $16.95 Ill 224 pp.



Father Pellegrino Maria Ernetti (1925-1994) was a Benedictine priest, scientist, and world-class authority on "archaic" music (pre-Christian to 10th century A.D.). He claimed to have yoked quantum physics to the occult arts to construct a time-machine-- the chronovisor. Father Ernetti said he had traveled to Rome in 169 B.C. to witness a performance of the now-lost tragedy, Thyestes, by the father of Latin poetry, Quintus Ennius. He claimed to have used the chronovisor to watch Christ dying on the cross. Why would so distinguished a churchman have felt the need to confabulate such a story? Is the Vatican suppressing the full truth of Father Ernetti’s life and achievements? The reader may find the answer in this book.



Reviews in Full

"Certainly a Cult Classic in the Making. Fortean Rating: 4 out of 4 Stars.
Jeremy of Hampstead, Fiona of Bloomsbury, beware. European-style intellectual novels are making a comeback with a New Age touch. There are now no excuses for being a pre-industrial writer any more. Father Ernetti's Chronovisor is a beautifully written literary-cum-fictional experiment, in the Umberto Eco tradition. The book could have been a candidate for a review by Arthur Koestler in the long-defunct CIA-sponsored Encounter magazine. It could well represent a growing anti-pop movement in that genre which is now called "pan-dimensional." This style, while not "stream-of-consciousness" or collage, nevertheless juxtaposes many elements: an esoteric story, essays on occultism, historical elements and technological myths--just about everything that FT readers are interested in. Father Ernetti was an Italian Benedictine monk who died in the middle years of this [the 20th] century. He lived in the lovely abbey on the island of San Giorgio Maggiore, just off the main island of Venice, and as a scientist and musicologist, he was an authority on archaic music. Using his knowledge of the physics of chordal structures, he claimed to have made a time-machine. This was based on a new principle he had uncovered, involving musical frequencies, harmonic resonance and the relationship of these things with the astral plane. By means of this machine, Father Ernetti said that he witnessed Christ dying on the Cross. To prove that he could do such a thing, he brought back a fragment from Thyestes, a play of Quintus Ennius (239-169 B.C.). This new material, though it fitted perfectly Ennius's play, caused great controversy within the church, as of course did Father Ernetti's claimed visions of the life of Christ. How did the obviously sincere Father Ernetti construct his machine? To try and answer that question, we are treated to a fascinating investigation threading through Edison, Edgar Cayce, Mesmer, and even Whitley Strieber!" - Colin Bennett, The Fortean Times, July, 2000

"...has garnered huge critical acclaim....A riveting read. Subtitled, "The Creation and Disappearance of the World's First Time Machine," this book tells the story of a little-known Benedictine monk, Father Pellegrino Maria Ernetti, who lived in Italy around the middle of the 20th century. Ernetti's claim to fame was his assertion that he had combined ancient occult knowledge with modern scientific discoveries to create a time machine, the Chronovisor. He then claimed to have used this machine to witness such historical events as the Crucifixion, and to "open a window" on ancient Greece and Rome. Peter Krassa's book is a well-researched account of Ernetti's life and work that has garnered huge critical acclaim. Originally published in Germany, the book now has a new English translation, but, at present, is only available in a U.S. edition. However, those willing to take the necessary pains to get hold of a copy are sure to be rewarded. The book dips into many of the areas that will be of interest to X Factor readers, from fringe science to the occult, and offers insights into the lives of many of the great figures within the world of 20th-century paranormal phenomena. Above all, however, this book is an intriguing account of one man's attempts to understand the secrets of the universe and his own place within it. A riveting read." -X Factor (U.K.), early June, 2000, No. 91:

"Everything about the life of Father Pellegrino Ernetti suggests that this Italian Benedictine priest-scientist was a man of integrity and would not have created a hoax about his work on the chronovisor--a camera that allegedly could tune into the past or future and take pictures. Venice-based Father Ernetti (1925-1994) was an authority on archaic music, a scholar in Greek and Latin, a sought-after exorcist, a confidant of the influential, and an object of questioning by the Vatican and NASA. His work on the so-called chronovisor stemmed from his time at Father Gemelli's electroacoustical laboratory at the Catholic University in Milan from 1952. So writes Peter Krassa in his fascinating exposé of Ernetti's life and work, translated from German and now expanded with supporting documents--such as the translation of the lost Latin classic, Ennius's Thyestes, supposedly retrieved via the chronovisor. Krassa draws on commentaries from associates of Ernetti, some of them priest-parapsychologists who were excited that he may have found a way to tap the elusive akashic records. Apparently the chronovisor (if it ever existed) was dismantled, its capacity for misuse too great to justify continued experimentation. Fr Ernetti went very quiet in the last decade of his life (by choice or force?), but, in late 1993, he and two surviving scientists from the project presented their findings at the Vatican before four cardinals and a scientific committee. What transpired has not been divulged." - NEXUS New Times, Vol. 7, No. 5, Aug.-Sept., 2000:

"It seems that this past summer I made a grave error; I wish to amend it now. I was attracted to Father Ernetti’s Chronovisor as soon as it arrived at The New Times, but never quite understanding what the book was, I continued to pass on it for review. When I recently tackled it just to better know my draw to the thing, I found myself on a journey that I knew I must share. While The New Times works to review only the latest titles, this one (at just over half a year old) deserves a second look.

"Purporting to be a biography, the book is a great deal more. Yes, it is fascinating enough as a biography — it tells of a scientist/theologian who developed a machine to look into the past — but it is also much more. To set the context of Father Ernetti, to show how his chronovisor fit into the human quest for spirit, the author also offers fascinating accounts of others who have added so much to our spiritual understandings. The chronovisor, after all, purported to grasp both sounds and images from the still-existent waves of the past, held forever in the Akashic records.

"Mr. Krassa does not merely offer examples of what these are, but gives an entire background by telling us of the 18th-century birth of mesmerism and animal magnetism, which effects came from 'a "vital fluid" diffused everywhere throughout the universe.' The author shows the spread of this belief in varied forms, and takes us through the lives of people like Madame Blavatsky, Rudolf Steiner, and Edgar Cayce to explain where all of this went. He even tells of Thomas Edison’s apparatus to contact the dead!

"Enter Father Ernetti and his chronovisor. The father was widely known for his expertise in archaic music, and for his interest and talent in science and languages. When he began to speak of a machine built by scientists that allowed them to witness the past in 3D, you can bet that people took note. But with fascinating irregularities to the claims, people’s reactions widely varied. A huge reaction set in when Ernetti claimed to have photographed the crucified Christ — and when the photo was proven a fake. Ernetti was a man of good repute, and Mr. Krassa examines why an honest man would lie in this way, why he would withhold information on the supposed machine, and just what was really going on with the father.

"If I may reclassify the book, I’d call it investigative reporting of a fascinating mystery. And, it helps the reader understand better where we stand today by better seeing from where the spiritual movement has arisen. This is one of the most interesting accounts I have read, and I recommend it for those wanting to take an unusual reading trip." -

Steve McCardell, The New Times, Seattle, Washington, Fall, 2000

"All roads may lead to Rome, but in Krassa's book all story lines lead back to Father Ernetti. The Benedictine monk, a scientist and professor of archaic music, had a thirst for knowledge that led him down unusual paths for a clergyman. With the help of other scientists, he built a time machine and brought back a picture of Christ and a selection from a Quintus Ennius play called Thyestes, which was performed in 169 B.C. Besides the fascinating work of Father Ernetti, Krassa includes intriguing study of other time and space manipulators, from Madame Blavatsky to Thomas Edison. So rev up your astral fluid for a titillating journey into the ether." - Linda Fleischman, Magical Blend, Issue # 72:
"Something about being able to travel to the past and perceive firsthand a bygone era or past event is extremely enticing, maybe because it seems so impossible. Author Peter Krassa uses this magic to produce a book which is simultaneously exciting and disappointing. The nonfiction book begins like an adventure story. An Italian priest, Father Ernetti, stumbles upon the ability to communicate with the dead via standard audio recording equipment; as the plot unfolds he uses this knowledge to build the chronovisor, a machine that displays images from the past on a TV screen. This part of the book is well-written and suspenseful, with each chapter ending in a cliffhanger. Unfortunately, its similarities to fiction do not end there: Krassa fails to provide us with any real reason why we should accept this serial as truth. The only proof of the existence of the chronovisor he gives us is second-hand testimony from friends of the priest, who died in 1994. They say he told them of his fabulous machine; no testimony is given from anyone who actually saw it. This attempt to substantiate Ernetti’s claim does not hold up well against the hoaxes he was accused of perpetrating. The second half of the book, while not quite so spellbinding, may hold more interest for the discerning reader. In this section, Krassa gives detailed summaries of many key figures in the paranormal movement. These people’s lives, beliefs, discoveries and thoughts are truly fascinating, and inspire the reader to research these figures further. The purpose of this summary section is to lend historical credence to the possibility of a time machine, by discussing the nature of time, "etheric fluid," past attempts by individuals to time travel, and much more, and linking all these subjects together to "prove" how the time machine worked. Again, however, Krassa fails to convince, and the support for his story consists of leaps in logic and exercises in hypothesis. All in all, this book is very entertaining at first, and fascinating later on, but in the end I remain unconvinced of the reality of Father Ernetti’s chronovisor." – Janet Brennan, Fate, November, 2000:

"In this unusual work, the author sets forth to describe Father Ernetti's creation of a time machine. What is more unusual is that the Venetian priest managed to realize the contraption under the wing of the Roman Catholic Church. Yet his machine afforded more than mere travel into the past and future, but rather embodied a kind of living metaphor for our time. The Father's machine afforded a look at linearity, the Gregorian calendar, perhaps even Bishop Ussher's insistence that the world was created on September 21, 4004 B.C., a belief still held by some even in this day of quantum non-locality. The author describes other achronological curios such as Baird T. Spalding's Camera of Past Events, the Secret School of Whitley Strieber, as well as Edgar Cayce. Also, information on Thomas Edison's device to contact the dead is described in this worthwhile volume." - Jaye C. Beldo, Dream Network, Vol. 19, No. 3.

"For me what makes Father Ernetti's Chronovisor a treasure-trove of hard-to-find information is all the documentation on the Akashic Records it brings together for the first time, as well as the superb biographies of much-misunderstood yet seminal historical figures, such as Helena P. Blavatsky and Franz Mesmer. This fascinating book is a most welcome addition to my library." - George Andrews, author of Extra-Terrestrials Among Us, Extra-Terrestrial Friends and Foes, and Pyramids and Palaces, Monsters and Mazes: The Golden Age of Mayan Architecture:

"Father Ernetti's Chronovisor is a brilliantly-researched, absorbing compendium of a current-times Benedictine monk's forays into specific events in the life of Christ and ancient Greece. Using his enigmatic invention--the chronovisor--scientist/scholar/exorcist Father Ernetti plumbs the depths and drives a cutting wedge into man's hidden past, our access to alleged akashic records, and the present-day relevance of those to such new and baffling paranormal techniques as electronic voice phenomena and transcommunications with television and computers. Peter Krassa illuminates his thesis with sparkling accounts of the life and achievements of such fellow time-travelers as Madame Blavatsky, Rudolph Steiner and Thomas A. Edison, and some others not quite so well-known, such as the controversial free energy inventor/genius(?) John Worrell Keely. Wow! Once you start reading Father Ernetti's Chronovisor, you won't put it down till you've finished. It is a first-rate, challenging mystery-thriller, not fiction but--whatever the true explanation behind it all is--the "real thing!" - Berthold E. Schwarz, M.D. (Psych.), author of Parent-Child Telepathy, UFO Dynamics, Psychiatric and Paranormal Aspects of UFOlogy, The Jacques Romano Story and many others:

"Is Father Ernetti's Chronovisor a flight of fancy or the real thing? The question has tantalized the scientific and religious communities for nearly 40 years, ever since the September day in 1952 when two Benedictine priests collaborating in a laboratory at the Roman Catholic University of Milan stumbled on its discovery. In a moment of frustration, Father Ernetti entreated his departed father for help with a problem, and was astounded to hear an answer from him through a recording device they were working on! This event led to the development of the Chronovisor, a time camera that can retrieve sound and sight images from space and project them on a screen. Father Ernetti eschews any connection with parapsychology or metaphysics, claiming instead that his machine is based on the scientific principle that light and sound waves are not lost after emission but are transformed and remain indefinitely in the ether. Without trying to explain the pertinent theories, suffice to say that the Chronovisor can recapture and reconstitute sound waves even from by-gone centuries--including a Roman tragedy that was performed in 169 B.C.! Ernetti is no visionary or magician, but a highly regarded scientist, an authority on prepolyphonic music, a professor, and the director of the Italian Secretariat of Religious Instruction of Man. As Krassa attempts to reconcile fact and fiction, his book will challenge your thinking--but we are reminded of Hamlet's observation: "There are more things on heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy." - P.S., The NAPRA Review, Vol. 11, No. 3, May-June, 2000:

"Time travel? This book is based on the work of Father Pellegrino Ernetti, a well-respected Italian Benedictine priest, who claimed to have engineered a device to "view" the past called a "chronovisor." First published in 1997 as Die Schichsal ist vorherbestimmt (Your Destiny is Foretold), by Peter Krassa, this edition has been expanded to include previously unreleased documents that have recently been made available to the American editors--the most intriguing of these being the long-lost Latin text of Quintus Ennius's play, Thyestes, which is reported to have been brought back through time by Father Ernetti. Reading this book is in itself an expedition in time travel. We are introduced to leaders in the fields of occultism, spiritualism, alchemy and science, and we are taken to the beginnings of time and back again, in an exciting journey of possibility that gives more than enough credence to Father Ernetti's claims. This updated American edition leaves no stone unturned and is a comprehensive wealth of knowledge. Each chapter is a story within this multifaceted work; both newcomers and serious students of occultism will be impressed by Peter Krassa's well researched and refreshingly unbiased study into time and space." - Kyles, Psychic Interactive, No. 4 (Australia):

"A strange case!....The text of the play [Thyestes] is translated here, and there is genuine wonder why such an otherwise accomplished individual as Father Ernetti would have fabricated such a bizarre fantasy or hoax. A curious book, and a book for the curious." - Robert C. Girard, Arcturus Books Catalog, March, 2000:

"In the middle part of the twentieth century, Italian Benedictine monk Pellegrino Maria Ernetti claimed to have created a time machine he called the "chronovisor" through which he could see and hear events of the past including Christ dying on the cross and a performance of a now-lost tragedy, Thyestes, by the father of Latin Poetry, Quintus Ennius, in Rome in 169 B.C. Father Ernetti was a leading authority on archaic music and claimed to have combined the insights of modern physics with ancient occult knowledge of the astral planes to build his invention. After his death the chronovisor was nowhere to be found, leading his critics to proclaim this otherwise distinguished scientist-priest a fraud. This American edition of Peter Krassa's Father Ernetti's Chronovisor: The Creation and Disappearance of the World's First Time Machine includes the first translation from Latin to English of the text of Thyestes which Father Ernetti claimed to have recovered using the chronovisor. This and other newly-discovered documents contain astonishing revelations refuting the claims of fraud against the strange, tormented, brilliant Father Pellegrino Ernetti. Father Ernetti's Chronovisor is a highly recommended biographical study for students of metaphysics, religion, and science." - Midwest Book Review, April, 2000:

Bron: ->> http://wesclark.com/jw/vatican_time_machine.html
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